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Design Focus – Esme Jumper knitting pattern and kit

When we went to the Spring Knitting and Stitching Show earlier this month one of your absolute favourite designs was our Esme Jumper. And no wonder, it is such a versatile pattern with options for a sleeveless version ideal for warmer weather. So, for this months Design Focus blog post I will take you through the design in further detail!

Esme Jumper

Cable knitting can often seem daunting, but honestly, once you have sorted out which finger holds which needle whilst knitting which stitch, it really isn’t that hard! The concept lies in stitches swapping places. See, plain and simple! You move some stitches onto a spare needle, work the following stitches before working the stitches from the spare needle. Simples.  Take a look at this informative video if you would like further advice on cable knitting.

The Esme Jumper have only one type of cable, a plait. To create the plait you will be using two types of cabling techniques, a right and a left slanting cable. In the pattern these are described as follows:

3/3 LC – Slip 3 sts to cable needle and hold at front of work. Knit next 3 sts, knit 3 sts from cable needle.
3/3 RC – Slip 3 sts to cable needle and hold at back of work. Knit next 3 sts, knit 3 sts from cable needle.

These two techniques, when worked alternately, will create a beautiful plait! If you would like to practice this technique on a smaller piece of knitting, our Diana Headband is the ideal starting point. Learning a new technique by making something small is a great confidence builder, and ripping out to fix mistakes gives you less of a heart ache when the row has 20 sts and not 200!

diana headband cable knitting

The Esme Jumper has a picot edge along the hem and this is maybe the trickiest part of the design. The hem is created by working a row of eyelet holes and then later on picking up your cast on edge to create a fold along the eyelet row. If you are finding the picking up of stitches tricky, the hem can be sewn up after the garment is finished.

The design has a beautiful peplum detail which is very flattering and the stitch pattern naturally progresses into the cable section of the body. The neckline is square, a very flattering shape for a lot of women, and the sleeves are nicely fitted. The sleeves have a cable running up them and the back has the same peplum and cables as the front. To me, the back of a garment is as important as the front, and often you will find little extra details at the back of my designs.

Esme Jumper Back

The pattern comes with instructions for both the jumper and a sleeveless top version. It also has details for the princess collar shown in the images of the brown jumper as well as a plain rib edging.  All the various options makes this a great pattern for creating your perfect garment! If you would like the kit for the sleevless top you can find it here!

Esme Sleeveless jumper

The jumper is knitted in our Fine yarn and uses mainly 4 mm needles. It never gets boring to knit though, as there are so much going on all the time with cables, shaping and design details. The body of the jumper is knitted flat so you can use straight or circular needles whilst we recommend circular needles for the neckline.

There are so many stunning finished garments over on Ravelry, take a look for yourself! One of our favourite versions is Susan Crowe’s jumper in ivory. She has done a great job of knitting it and it really suits her! Take a look at her blog for her review of the pattern and of the finished garment.

Susan in Esme

We hope you feel inspired to cast on your own Esme! If you do, the pattern can be found here, the knitting kit can be ordered here or you can head over to Ravelry and add it to your queue.

Happy knitting!

Kari-Helene xxx

 

 

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2 comments

  1. Ba: August 20, 2017 9:23 am

    I am currently knitting the Esme jumper in XL size. I am having problems with the set up row as when I add up all the stitches, I am left with an extra 2 (total stitches 139 in the pattern). Where am I going wrong?

    Thank you

  2. tracy.birch: September 5, 2017 2:51 pm

    Hi, I’ve just checked the pattern and I’m getting 139 stitches as written. Are you sure that the increase isn’t from the picot edge?

    If you’re still stuck, perhaps it would be better to talk this through over the phone and my number is 07785 261089 – opening hours 10-2; 6-7 Tuesday to Saturday.

    Happy knitting! Tracy and the alpacas (although they don’t answer the phone!)

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